is religion antiquated?

When people denounce religion in a reductivist way as to imply that modernity should make us all transcend such baseness, it makes me fear for humanity. Those who say this are usually white people in industrialized nations, where they are so far removed from the raw human condition that dwells in the cracks of suffering like poverty like death of children like rampant spread of crippling diseases, that they’ve forgotten their insignificant place in this universe.

 
Religion is ingrained in the subconscious as an archetype – it’s shaped the paths we’ve crossed as a collective from time immemorial. When you look down on it, you have put yourself at the centre of the universe. You’ve erased your human limits and imperfections because modern conveniences insulates you from feeling the powerlessness this man felt.

Continue Reading

Quantum eemaan

This life, this corporeal existence, is really about choosing to follow our egos, which is a detached entity with arbitrarily constructed perceptions, or our intuition which is the window to the divine. But that choice doesn’t have the significant impact we’d like to think. We like to believe that if we work harder and faster, that we can make something of the temporary blip on the radar that is our lives. And if someone doesn’t beat time and space before the time is up, well, that’s a wasted life.

°°°

How can we be so deluded as to think that something as ethereal and mysterious as life essence is subject to the validation of the masses? Because let’s be clear, when we think of making something out of our lives and leaving a legacy, we depend on the recognition of our works. Anything that can’t be quantified or labelled is not important. Life lessons carved from heartaches and lonely nights spent writhing in existential agony are useless. Unless you can bottle that and market it, then that’s when your experiences truly matter.

Continue Reading

Concerts and kings

إِذَا تُتْلَى عَلَيْه آيَاتُنَا قَالَ أَسَاطِيرُ الْأَوَّلِينَ

{When Our Verses (of the Qur’an) are recited to him he says: “Tales of the ancients!}¹

كَلَّا بَلْ رَانَ عَلىٰ قُلُوبِهِم مَّا كَانُوا يَكْسِبُونَ

{Nay! But their hearts were made impenetrable by the evil they used to do.}

كَلَّا إِنَّهُمْ عَن رَّبِّهِمْ يَوْمَئِذٍ لَّمَحْجُوبُونَ

{Nay! Surely they will be veiled from their Lord that Day}

ثُمَّ إِنَّهُمْ لَصَالُو الْجَحِيمِ

{ Then indeed, they will [enter and] burn in Hellfire.}

ثُمَّ يُقَالُ هَذَا الَّذِي كُنتُم بِهِ تُكَذِّبُونَ

 {Then, it will be said to them: “This is what you used to deny!}


The only way to find pleasure in having no integrity is by rejecting everything that calls for integrity. Because your heart requires you to be pervious to the universal truths in order for you to be in sync with it, you’ll have to shut your heart – meaning, your conscience and intuition – off, like an alarm clock.

Continue Reading

the divine jackpot

​One of the chief barriers to accepting God’s generosity is our limited notion of what we are in fact able to accomplish. We may tune in to the voice of the creator within, hear a message—and then discount it as crazy or impossible. On the one hand, we take ourselves very seriously and don’t want to look like idiots pursuing some patently grandiose scheme. On the other hand, we don’t take ourselves—or God—seriously enough and so we define as grandiose many schemes that, with God’s help, may fall well within our grasp.
Remembering that God is my source, we are in the spiritual position of having an unlimited bank account. Most of us never consider how powerful the creator really is. Instead, we draw very limited amounts of the power available to us. We decide how powerful God is for us. We unconsciously set a limit on how much God can give us or help us. We are stingy with ourselves. And if we receive a gift beyond our imagining, we often send it back.
[…] One reason we are miserly with ourselves is scarcity thinking. We don’t want our luck to run out. We don’t want to overspend our spiritual abundance. Again, we are limiting our flow by anthropomorphizing God into a capricious parent figure.

Remembering that God is our source, an energy flow that likes to extend itself, we become more able to tap our creative power effectively.
God has lots of money. God has lots of movie ideas, novel ideas, poems, songs, paintings, acting jobs. God has a supply of loves, friends, houses that are all available to us. By listening to the creator within, we are led to our right path. On that path, we find friends, lovers, money, and meaningful work. Very often, when we cannot seem to find an adequate supply, it is because we are insisting on a particular human source of supply. We must learn to let the flow manifest itself where it will— not where we will it.
[…] It is as though we want to believe God can create the subatomic structure but is clueless when faced with how to aid or fix our painting, sculpture, writing, film.
[…] creativity is a spiritual issue. Any progress is made by leaps of faith, some small and some large. At first, we may want faith to take the first dance class, the first step toward learning a new medium. Later, we may want the  faith and the funds for further classes, seminars, a larger work space, a year’s sabbatical. Later still, we may conceive an idea for a book, an artists’ collective gallery space. As each idea comes to us, we must in good faith clear away our inner barriers to acting on it and then, on an outer level, take the concrete steps necessary to trigger our synchronous good.

Julia Cameron ( The Artist’s Way: a spiritual path to a higher creativity)

Synergy

Only the existence of a field of force can account for the
motions of the bodies as observed, and its assumption
dispenses with space curvature. All literature on this
subject is futile and destined to oblivion. So are all
attempts to explain the workings of the universe without
recognizing the existence of the ether and the
indispensable function it plays in the phenomena.
My second discovery was of a physical truth of the greatest
importance. As I have searched the entire scientific
records in more than a half dozen languages for a long time
without finding the least anticipation, I consider myself
the original discoverer of this truth, which can be
expressed by the statement: There is no energy in matter
other than that received from the environment.

 

I came across this quote that’s attributed to Nikola Tesla ( I couldn’t find any original source to confirm this) and regardless of who authored it ( though it’s very Tesla-esque), it explained this Islamic invocation (dikr) :

لا حول ولا قوّۃ الا باللہ

{Laa Hawla wa Laa Quwwata illaa Bi-llaah}

Which is often translated to mean: There’s no might nor power except by Allaah

But my understanding has been different, and it’s been reiterated by Tesla’s theory of quantum physics:

There’s no movement of an object that can be made nor exertion of force upon an object without the energy and power of Allaah.

This is synergy. This is the ‘how’ of stardusts and seas and limbic systems and bumblebees. 

No more posts.